Clerity Now Shipping Mainframe Migration Application Development Tool

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Clerity Solutions, a provider of mainframe migration, modernization, and optimization solutions, announced the availability of an application development tool that provides a graphical user interface environment for the design, creation, and maintenance of former mainframe-based 3270 "green screens" on cost-effective open systems.

The new release, Clerity Map Editor, is the latest mainframe modernization solution from Clerity, which offers the UniKix mainframe rehosting software suite, designed to help companies run CICS, IMS, IDMS, Adabas/Natural, and other legacy assets on distributed servers.

"The primary users of Clerity Map Editor will be shops who are running rehosted CICS and batch workloads on Unix, Linux, Windows and Linux on System z partitions who have chosen to maintain existing 3270 green screen end-user interfaces delivered by BMS map sets," Shwetank Srivastava, vice president of product development and services at Clerity, tells 5 Minute Briefing. "Since the environment is a straightforward GUI-based tool it can be leveraged by developers regardless of whether or not they have mainframe-based skills."

Clerity Map Editor offers a simple, intuitive way to build, edit, and maintain CICS Basic Mapping Support (BMS) Maps for rehosted mainframe workloads running in UniKix software environments. With Clerity Map Editor, standalone BMS files and BMS files associated with COBOL copybooks can be displayed, modified, and generated on any Windows, Unix, or Linux-based system supporting a Java Runtime Environment 6.0 or greater.

"This tool is also an alternative for COBOL/CICS mainframe programmers whose workloads still reside on the mainframe," Srivasta says. "Since Clerity Map Editor is a standalone offering, it provides a cost-effective option for screen maintenance."

Because Clerity Map Editor provides a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) view of the 3270 maps being generated, no formal knowledge of BMS macro coding is required to use the product, the vendor says.

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