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Five Minute Briefing - Information Management
September 16, 2014

Five Minute Briefing - Information Management: September 16, 2014. A concise weekly report with key product news, market research and insight for data management professionals and IT executives.

News Flashes

To learn about the cutting-edge tools and techniques for improving time to insight, and hear how other organizations have been able to differentiate themselves by improving the access, performance and productivity of their analytical systems, join Database Trends and Applications for a special roundtable webcast on September 18th.

Recognizing that it is the startups that need enterprise features and high level support more than anyone else, but are least equipped to pay for it, Aerospike Inc. has announced a startup special to attract new customers to its open source flash optimized, in-memory open source NoSQL database. In addition, Aerospike has also announced a new trade-in program, that allows enterprises to swap out certain existing technology for Aerospike Enterprise Edition, for no cost throughout the duration of their standing software and support licenses.

Basho has announced the general availability of version 2.0 of its NoSQL database Riak, which extends the platform in five major ways: search, security, advanced data types, ease of use, and the tiered storage.

To help customers to meet demanding data challenges, Embarcadero Technologies has announced a major new XE6 release of its portfolio of database tools, including ER/Studio, DBArtisan and Rapid SQL.

FoundationDB has introduced SQL Layer, a SQL database engine powered by the FoundationDB key-value store. By providing a familiar SQL interface, the new SQL Layer "reduces the barriers to adoption by orders of magnitude," said Ori Herrnstadt, head of SQL Layer development at FoundationDB.

A new survey of data managers and professionals who are subscribers to DBTA finds that, over the next 10 years, about two-fifths of respondents expect to leave the field - with about half of those people retiring and the other half moving on to other jobs in management or self-employment.

Think About It

In simpler times, businesses kept their data in one place. That made the data easy to access and control. Today, many large enterprises have a global component to daily business transactions, with customers, partners and employees located around the world. Given the distributed nature of an organization's users and increasing data location regulations, the traditional method of storing data on a central server to support worldwide stakeholders no longer meets business needs.