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Dr. Michael Corey and Don Sullivan

Dr. Michael Corey, a co-founder of LicenseFortress, is a successful entrepreneur, recognized Oracle AceVMware vExpert, and former Microsoft Data Platform MVP  has worked with relational databases for over 35 years, starting with Oracle Version 3. In 2017 was recognized as one of the Top 100 people who influence the cloud.

Michael is the original Oracle Press author who has written several books published by (Oracle Press/Osborne McGraw-Hill) and VMware Press. Topics include  Virtualizing SQL Server with VMware: Doing IT Right, Oracle Database 12 Install, Configure & Maintain Like a Professional to Oracle Data Warehousing. He is a frequent contributor to Database Trends and Applications and the Big Data Quarterly

Michael is a frequent speaker at business and technology conferences throughout the world.  

An active member in the technology community, a past president of the Independent Oracle Users Group (IOUG), he helped establish the Professional Association of SQL Server. Michael is the original recipient of the IOUG “Special Recognition” award, now known as the Chris Wooldridge Award, and received the only Lifetime Membership awarded by the Independent Oracle Users Group.

Michael received a gubernatorial appointment to the Massachusetts Robert H. Goddard Council for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Michael received his doctoral degree from Temple University, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Check out his blog at http://michaelcorey.com.


Don Sullivan has been with VMware since 2010. He is the product line marketing manager for Business Critical Applications. For more information, go to www.vmware.com.

Articles by Dr. Michael Corey and Don Sullivan

Unlike their historical ancestors who carried out their acts during a violent war, these pirates of the information superhighway hone their skills so that they can attack remotely when war is imminent or whenever else they wish. They can use these cyberskills to disrupt key infrastructure such as a gas pipeline, a hospital, or other critical facets of an ever-narrowing and fragile supply chain. While they do not carry letters of marque, we know many are state-sponsored.

Posted September 27, 2021

As many people in the world pass through the eye of the pandemic storm, aspiring to survive and experience the sun again, another catastrophe looms—albeit barely visible. This potentially devastating problem lurks around the corner from the big-box store that may have just provided their COVID-19 vaccinations, but it is of a very different nature. We are facing a pending tsunami of automation.

Posted May 26, 2021

The world changed over the last year. Future historians will complete their theses focusing on different quarters or even specific months of 2020. But one of the most overused cliches in thinking about this period of time has been the idea that "the more things change, the more they remain the same." Let's consider sports in 2020. Major League Baseball had a 60-game season, the NBA finals were played in October, and cardboard cutouts took the place of fans in every sport. However, the Lakers won the NBA finals, the Dodgers won the World Series with the Yankees playing deep into the playoffs, and Tom Brady went to his 10th Super Bowl. The more things change …

Posted April 05, 2021

As Charles Darwin famously posited, it is not strength but rather the ability to adapt that is critical for survival. We see examples of this all around.

Posted January 18, 2021

No matter where you live in the world, your life has been impacted by the technology and innovation conceived of in Silicon Valley. The wealth that has been created has been enormous. A popular British newspaper once published an article suggesting that if Silicon Valley were a country, it would be among the richest on Earth.

Posted September 11, 2020

Pandemics Happen—AI and Machine Learning Can Provide the Cures

Posted March 20, 2020

GPUs fuel AI and machine learning. Initially created for video games, they are used in sports and business analysis by fantasy baseball enthusiasts, oddsmakers, and front office executives who want to enhance their understanding of the hidden value of often obscure players. Other uses of this technology's extreme processing power include the recognition of animals, such as dog breeds or endangered species, to allow biologists to gain a more accurate understanding of species populations in a geographical area.

Posted March 17, 2020

Hybrid Clouds—Myth or Reality?

Posted December 09, 2019

There is no substitute for genius, and despite the awesome power of the GPU and the majesty of the new manifestations of AI, there is no substitute for the human mind.

Posted September 26, 2019

Next Stop, Silicon Valley Africa

Posted May 09, 2019

Asking the Tough Questions about the Starwood Data Breach

Posted April 15, 2019

What happened to the 500 million data points from the Starwood data breach?

Posted April 02, 2019

The State of Cloud Technologies: The Past Controls the Future

Posted January 31, 2019

The State of Cloud Technologies: The Past Controls the Future

Posted January 09, 2019

Both Oracle and SQL Server have very well-established communities. While they are different, they are also similar in many ways. All DBAs worry about the performance and security of the data and the database. Out of necessity, Oracle DBAs have become more specialized. Will this happen to SQL Server DBAs now that the database is offered on Linux?

Posted September 25, 2018

Silicon Valley has achieved an almost mythical status in both modern American popular culture as well as the annals of world economic history. Located south of San Francisco, the name "Silicon Valley" was coined in the early 1970s due to the volume of silicon chip innovators and manufacturers in the area. Today, the valley is synonymous with technology innovation and venture capital: two mighty forces of change.

Posted May 11, 2018

We live in a new world today, with unique challenges heretofore unseen in information technology. To remain at the expected technological apex, organizations should ask themselves these questions.

Posted March 26, 2018

A New Age: AI and Machine Learning Meet the Cloud

Posted January 03, 2018

Tic toc, tic toc—back and forth swings the privacy pendulum. While we in the U.S. continue to regress on issues of data privacy, the European Union (EU) is proceeding with bold steps to protect the privacy of its citizens. On May 25, 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) becomes the law of the land in the EU. It applies to any company that processes or holds data on EU residents, regardless of where it is located in the world. Popular applications such as Facebook, Twitter, and Airbnb are among the companies that will be directly impacted by this law. If you do business with EU residents, regardless of geographic locality, this law directly applies to you.

Posted September 20, 2017

Cloud technology has been around in some shape or form for more than 50 years. How can we make such a claim? Let's compare today's cloud computing to computer timesharing from the 1960s. Timesharing was a computing environment that supported multiple users simultaneously. This sounds suspiciously similar to the modern idea of "the cloud."

Posted June 29, 2017

To meet the new demands of managing infrastructure in the cloud in a proactive manner, the new role of the "cloud keeper" has emerged. The cloud keeper is part technologist, part accountant, and part administrator. The cloud keeper has financial responsibility for keeping control of infrastructure expenses to prevent financial chaos. The role is part technical, since it requires an understanding of how and where resources are deployed. The cloud keeper must know how a resource is paid for and have enough technical expertise to know which resources can be spun up or down or would be better suited for one cloud paradigm over another.

Posted April 07, 2017

Many providers of cloud services market the idea that all critical computing functions should be run using their public cloud services because this paradigm is the future and the future is now. While we do share that long-term vision, the reality is less impressive, and the solution is not yet complete. Amazon itself does not run 100% of its critical business systems in the AWS Public Cloud, a fact that was revealed in The Wall Street Journal article, "Cloud-Computing Kingpins Slow to Adapt to Own Movement." This is also true for Google, Microsoft, and other top cloud providers.

Posted November 15, 2016

Does GDPR Spell the End of the Cloud as We Know It Today?

Posted June 08, 2016

The pervasive corporate mindset to transition all levels of infrastructure to some cloud, somewhere, is accelerating the growth of the cloud industry with a rapidity so far unseen in the history of computing. This phenomenon has resulted in weighty pressure on CIOs to develop and deploy an effective and comprehensive cloud strategy or risk their organization falling behind this undeniable trend. The internet changed the information technology game, but now the cloud constitutes an entirely different league.

Posted March 31, 2016

"Caveat emptor" is Latin for "Let the buyer beware." In the realm of the modern information technology cloud, this sage advice rings especially true.

Posted November 13, 2015

Let's rephrase the question above: The next ticking time bomb is your database. Regardless of whether you run Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, or MySQL, the odds lean toward your organization having a ticking time bomb. The only question to be posed is whether you are going to become collateral damage or diffuse the bomb before the damage happens.

Posted August 10, 2015

Business pressures, including cost reduction, scalability, and "just-in-time" application software implementation, are just some of the requirements prompting businesses to "cloudify" at least some aspect of their IT infrastructure.

Posted May 19, 2015

In the beginning, information was unknown. Eventually, the growing populace absorbed information as it was passed on by each generation person to person, but only the elite had access to that knowledge base. King James and Guttenberg made that information more accessible to the general public but still, access to information was very limited. Galileo, the famous Italian physicist, mathematician and astronomer, originally published his finding in Latin that proved the world was in reality round not flat. Even though this science contradicted church doctrine, the population remained apathetic. When Galileo then published those same findings in Italian, he was excommunicated. By sharing this knowledge outside the "inner circle" he became an outcast. The world was not quite ready to share the "knowledge base" with the common man. As time passed, the ability of the privileged to keep the knowledge base contained to a privileged few waned.

Posted May 09, 2012

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