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BMC Finds Nine in 10 See Long-Term Viability of Mainframe


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BMC, a provider of data center solutions, announced the results of its 12th annual Mainframe Research Report, highlighting the power and value of the mainframe for digital business. The survey of 1,000 enterprises finds even as many organizations continue to adopt multi-cloud technologies as part of their dramatic transformation, the mainframe remains a relevant and growing data center hub for many. The survey highlights that organizations are committed to the mainframe, as respondents are modernizing their operations and technologies, have a more positive attitude toward the mainframe, and are changing their workforce to ensure the right staffing and skills are on board.

With 91% of survey respondents predicting that mainframe workloads will continue to grow, it’s clear that they view the mainframe as a viable, long-term platform. Attitudes about the mainframe also continue to evolve. Contrary to the perception that executives want to replace mainframes, many recognize that mainframes are a critical core IT platform. In this year’s results, 47% of executives indicate they will grow and attract new workloads.

While many priorities remained unchanged from last year’s survey, staffing and skills leaped forward as a key priority as respondents modernize their mainframe environment. This year, 44% of respondents indicate that staffing and skills are key challenges due to the changing workforce, and 36% of respondents indicate this is a priority in the coming year.

With 66% of respondents indicating that they will focus on planned outages to increase availability, the survey dispels the myth that organizations have fully optimized their mainframes. The top applications running on the mainframe are transactional systems, big data, and analytics, and organizations continue to focus on increasing availability.

The survey also dispels several myths about the mainframe workforce, including the perception that mainframe professionals are all older in age, while younger IT professionals are pessimistic about the mainframe industry’s prospects. For example, 53% of respondents are under the age of 50, and many of these respondents have a positive view of the mainframe. Another 69% of those in the mid-career group (ages 30 to 49 with one to ten years of experience), see growth in their mainframe workloads and view the mainframe as having a strong position of growth in the industry overall. In addition, the survey shows, millennials under the age of 30 are very enthusiastic about the future of the mainframe.

To read the full 2017 BMC Mainframe Research Report, visit www.bmc.com/mainframesurvey.


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