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April 2016 - UPDATE

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Trends and Applications

Along with an increasing flow of big data that needs to be captured and analyzed, IT departments today also have more solution choices than ever before. However, before making a solution selection, organizations need to understand their requirements and also evaluate the attributes of the possible tools.

With the speed of business constantly increasing, the demand for real-time data has grown along with it. As business-driven demands on data speed heighten, however, some organizations are still inhibited by slow moving data that can't keep up. New strategies must be created to process data at the speed that is expected from today.

The COLLABORATE 16 conference for Oracle users kicked off with a presentation by Unisphere Research analyst Joe McKendrick who shared insights from a ground-breaking study that examined future trends and technology among 690 members of three major Oracle users groups.

The need for data integration has never been more intense than it has been recently. The Internet of Things and its muscular sibling, the Industrial Internet of Things, are now being embraced as a way to better understand the status and working order of products, services, partners, and customers. Mobile technology is ubiquitous, pouring in a treasure trove of geolocation and usage data. Analytics has become the only way to compete, and with it comes a need for terabytes—and gigabytes—worth of data. The organization of 2016, in essence, has become a data machine, with an insatiable appetite for all the data that can be ingested.

The greatest power in using IoT-derived insights is the ability respond to opportunities or threats immediately. However, enterprises largely have focused on historical reporting and will need to significantly modernize their analytics capabilities—both in understanding current events and predicting future outcomes—to take advantage of the new insights that IoT data can bring.

Database as a service, also known as DBaaS, offers a solution to some key issues that have vexed enterprise database shops for years. That is, how to maintain and update back-end technologies; how to integrate data from multiple, changeable sources without the need to rewrite the applications that depend on them; and how to make data readily accessible to end users who need it regardless of the device they are using.

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