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July 2015 - UPDATE

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Trends and Applications

No matter what the causes, a series of unfortunate events added up to a lot of bad news for data security and availability during one week earlier this month. In addition to an outage at the New York Stock Exchange, IT issues resulted in the grounding of United Airlines planes for 2 hours on the same day, and new revelations surfaced about a data breach at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

If you read the headlines, downtime is a real and material risk to your business. Whether it's international hackers, massive power outages or just hardware and software that reaches its end of life, IT organizations continue to be challenged by unplanned downtime and data loss. And it's costing them as much as $1.7 trillion a year.

Many developers are familiar with the relational way to model data but may not be as familiar with modeling data in a document database. There are three main things developers need to know about modeling data in a document database: document design, key design, and querying.

Before enterprises create data architecture for business intelligence and analytics, there are a few key components they need to consider.

Data integration requirements are growing more demanding. In today's computing environments, data must often be moved between on-premises systems and public clouds, between private and public clouds, between different hybrid clouds, or between different public clouds. A new report based on a survey conducted by Unisphere Research among 342 IOUG members looks at the current state of data integration in the cloud era, including the key issues, priorities and solutions being adopted by organizations. The "2015 IOUG Data Integration for Cloud Survey" was sponsored by Oracle.

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