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May 2014 - UPDATE

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Trends and Applications

Great tech conferences provide information on new approaches and thought-provoking - sometimes even uncomfortable - discussions. With three tracks of sessions, preconference workshops and a product showcase, DBTA's 3-day Data Summit conference in NYC allowed attendees to hear what experts really think is important in big data.

The explosion of machine data has made it impossible for humans to write every rule to detect relevant events. Most of these events are unknown, new (or rather anomalous), or indescribable, and as a result, they go undetected. IT organizations need a mechanism to automatically "tell" users what is happening inside of their data without the administrator's prerequisite knowledge of the event.

The mobile revolution has revitalized the need for searchable curated content. Mobile internet use and mobile search advertising spend are both predicted to overtake desktop usage and spend this year, and as people change the way they access the internet, they change the way they search.

The challenges of big data quality were discussed at Data Summit in NYC in a session presented by Paula Wiles Sigmon, program director, product marketing, IBM, and Elliot King, who has just authored a Unisphere Research report on how "governance moves data from hype to hope." Increasingly, organizations across industries are adopting formal data governance strategies to get a grip on their data lineage, quality and protection, said Sigmon.

Fast decision-making depends on real-time data movement that allows businesses to gather data from multiple locations into Hadoop as well as conventional data warehouses. Unfortunately, traditional ETL tools use slow data-scraping techniques that put a heavy load on operational systems and cannot meet the low latency required by many businesses.

In his hard-hitting presentation on big data at Data Summit, Rick Smolan, a Time, Life, and National Geographic photographer, and author of the book, "The Human Face of Big Data," described big data as "the development of a nervous system for the planet," and shared insights about the current impact as well as the potential for the future - of everything that can be measured being measured.

Henry Olson, director of product management, Embarcadero Technologies, tackled the cultural, technical and methodology gaps between the worlds of data architecture and agile development the challenge of retaining the benefit of data architecture and data modeling in the agile world in a lively presentation at DBTA's Data Summit in NYC that drew numerous follow-on questions from attendees.

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