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Five Minute Briefing - Data Center
November 2, 2009

Five Minute Briefing - Data Center: November 2, 2009. Published in conjunction with SHARE Inc., a bi-weekly report geared to the needs of data center professionals.

News Flashes

IBM announced the public beta of Smart Business Development and Test on the IBM Cloud, also known as 'Developer Cloud.' The solution includes Software Delivery Services from Rational Software and is designed to accelerate organizations' development and test cycles.

EnterpriseDB, a commercial software company supporting the PostgreSQL open source database, announced that Red Hat, an open source products and services vendor, has made a financial investment in EnterpriseDB. The company also said it is releasing a new version of Postgres Plus Standard Server.

IBM announced an expansion of its enterprise mashup portfolio that incorporates the latest version of IBM Mashup Center and a new offering called IBM Cognos 8 Mashup Service.

Novell announced the latest release of its data center workload profiling, analysis and planning tool. The product, PlateSpin Recon 3.7, combines consolidation planning with capacity management to give customers an ongoing view of their physical and virtual infrastructure. With this latest version, Novell says it has expanded PlateSpin Recon's resource analysis to include granular detail on current, historical, and expected future consumption of local and remote storage resources.

Progress Software Corporation, a provider of enterprise infrastructure software, recently announced the latest release for managing the complexity of interconnected distributed applications, and enabling users to detect and resolve problems between applications and their interactions, thereby ensuring100% transaction success.

News From SHARE

Online registration is now live for SHARE in Seattle, taking place March 14-18, 2010, at the Washington State Convention and Trade Center.

Think About It

It's really not an issue-at least in the view of Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, a nonprofit consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux. "In the end, if we are patient, they always will [contribute]. Nobody wants to maintain their own separate version of the Linux kernel," Zemlin says.