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NoSQL Central

The four main categories of NoSQL or Not-Only SQL Database systems are gaining popularity for Big Data, Web and Specialized applications. Key-Value Stores enable the storage of unstructured or schemaless data, aligned as a key and actual data; Column-Family databases, store



NoSQL Central Articles

CodeFutures Corporation has introduced the latest version of its dbShards, which provides cost-effective database scalability and performance using database sharding. The company also announced that Familybuilder, a fast-growing family application on the internet is using dbShards to keep up with the demands placed on its high-volume MySQL database, while simultaneously scaling to meet anticipated future growth.

Posted April 20, 2010

If you spend any time at all reading IT trade journals and websites, you've no doubt heard about the NoSQL movement. In a nutshell, NoSQL databases (also called post-relational databases) are a variety of loosely grouped means of storing data without requiring the SQL language. Of course, we've had non-relational databases far longer than we've had actual relational databases. Anyone who's used products like IBM's Lotus Notes can point to a popular non-relational database. However, part and parcel of the NoSQL movement is the idea that the data repositories can horizontally scale with ease, since they're used as the underpinnings of a website. For that reason, NoSQL is strongly associated with web applications, since websites have a history of starting small and going "viral," exhibiting explosive growth after word gets out.

Posted April 07, 2010

The concept of database sharding has gained popularity over the past several years due to the enormous growth in transaction volume and size of business-application databases. Database sharding can be simply defined as a "shared-nothing" partitioning scheme for large databases across a number of servers, enabling new levels of database performance and scalability. If you think of broken glass, you can get the concept of sharding—breaking your database down into smaller chunks called "shards" and spreading them across a number of distributed servers.

Posted August 14, 2009

Database sizes have grown exponentially, with more than half of all databases in use globally projected to exceed 10TB by 2010, according to The Data Warehouse Institute. But as the size of data warehouses has exploded and business requirements have forced companies to conduct more ad hoc queries on those warehouses, response times have slowed, requiring increasingly expensive database hardware investments.

Posted May 15, 2008

The data explosion driving data warehouse equipment purchases in the last few years has just begun. Equipment proliferation already pressurizes data center energy requirements. Fortunately, a column-based analytics server can help companies with both kinds of green - the environment and money - by offering enormous energy and cost reductions while significantly boosting performance.

Posted February 15, 2008

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